A Detailed Account of Apple’s New EasyPay System to Purchase a $200 Item

Earlier today the Apple Store app was updated to include support for Canada, and to also debut the new self-checkout feature called EasyPay (U.S. only at the moment).

Curious to know how this self-managed system works for accessory purchases? The Mac Observer went hands on today with the feature to purchase a $200 accessory. Users will first have to connect to in-store Apple Wi-Fi, then access EasyPay within the Apple Store app.

Here are their observations of EasyPay:

Using your phone’s camera, scan the barcode of any product on display. The app then brings up the product information, including price, pictures, and user reviews. A large green button at the bottom of the screen begs you to purchase the product and, conveniently, gives you the total cost including local sales tax. Pressing “Pay Now” automatically charges the card associated with your Apple.com store account. Thankfully, for those prone to losing their phone, the app does ask for the three or four digit security code before completing the transaction.
It takes just a second to complete the purchase, and you’re then presented with a thank you screen and access to a PDF version of your receipt.

Product purchased, we looked around, feeling a little odd about having not worked with an employee, and then walked out of the store. Not a single employee nor the uniformed security door gave us a second look, despite the fact that we were walking out with an $200+ product under our arm.

 

So, as you can see they were able to purchase a $200 item without being questioned by staff on their way out (the app even instructs you to ask for a bag, if you require one).

ReadItLater lead developer @SteveStreza also had a seamless EasyPay experience:

It’ll be curious to see how EasyPay will affect the occurrences of shoplifting, as customers will be walking in and out of stores at will. I have a strong inclination EasyPay (or EasyTheft?!) will be quite popular this holiday season.

Founder and Editor-in-Chief of iPhoneinCanada.ca. Follow me on Twitter, and @iPhoneinCanada, and on Google+.

  • Anonymous

    iTheft would occur a lot.

  • Playerno12345

    Apple has style!!!

    I wanna see Samsung do this…  

  • Wuju

    I would like to see how they handle iTheft. There must be something but what….

  • Wuju

    Syncing this app to iTunes freezes iTunes. What gives? Try download it directly from iTunes – it freezes iTunes as well and I had to Force Quite iTunes at the end multiple times. Reboot MacBook didn’t help. Bug?

  • http://www.zadig.info Mario Gaucher

    At least one employee may have a push notification or something like that to let them know that someone bought an item…

  • http://twitter.com/adamjefferson Adam Jefferson

    I hope this is successful and extends beyond the US once it’s proven successful. It’s a shame that shoplifting may increase – or at least, attempts at shoplifting may increase – as I suspect that once some numbers indicating the shoplifting frequency are determined, this practice will either be discontinued or limited in some other way. I was surprised that a $200 item was allowed to go through this process. But then again, our local grocery stores now have self checkouts that, in theory, would have the same issue of allowing customers to walk out with hundreds of dollars in groceries without really ever dealing with a cashier or other staff member.

    I’m not sure if other stores do, but our Apple Store in Mississauga has a security guard on duty at the entrance/exit so there is definitely concern of theft even without this self checkout option.

  • John H

    I don’t know if all Apple stores are like this but the one at Eatons Center in Toronto almost always has an employee or two at the entrance with an iPad.  I would guess that once a purchase is made a notification is sent to the iPad(s) at the front of the store and the employee there will just let you walk out with your purchase.