Apple’s iWatch Will Reportedly Feature LG Chem’s ‘Stepped Battery’ Technology

iWatch

The Korea Herald reports Apple will be using lithium-ion batteries supplied by Samsung SDI, Tianjin Lishen Battery, and LG Chem for its upcoming iWatch.

LG Chem produces stepped batteries which are said to offer a greater lifespan and flexibility, as they can be manufactured in a variety of shapes. A source, who declined to be identified, said:

“Apple will utilize LG Chem’s stepped battery since it offers better longevity than others and can be applied for different shapes”

A stepped battery is very similar to a traditional lithium-ion battery, but it contains a “step” on the back which allows for an increase in battery life. LG Chem said the technology allowed them to increase the battery life in the LG G2 by three hours, or by approximately 16 percent.

lg_stepped_battery

One of the challenges Apple is reportedly facing with the iWatch is battery life, with reports suggesting the company was only seeing two days of battery life in its prototype devices. Various reports have suggested Apple is looking at different ways to charge an iWatch-like device, for example wireless and solar charging.

Over the past several months Apple has been hiring medical experts who will reportedly be joining the iWatch team. The device is said to be health and fitness focused, providing users with data that will help them make better everyday decisions. Along with the iWatch, the company is reportedly working on a “Healthbook” app, expected to be released alongside iOS 8, and will allow users to see the data and information that is collected by the wearable device straight from their iPhone. Apple is expected to announce the iWatch in the second half of this year.

A software engineer with a passion for creation and innovation using technology. To learn more about me, check out my personal website, which contains links to my projects. Email: nick@iphoneincanada.ca

  • Thatguy

    What about that motion recharging technology? My friends watch never needs a battery, it gets power from the motion of his wrist. Insert masturbation joke here.

  • Canada

    A lot of high end watches have that features; it’s very cool. I don’t think the iWatch will for two reasons though. First, the amount of charge gained from kinetic motion is typically very small and likely be negligible on a MUCH more power hungry device like an iWatch.Second, the reason you see that on high end watches is because it’s a pretty precise (and expensive) mechanism.