Uber to Abandon Calgary, Unhappy with New Bylaw as Mayor Talks Tough

Uber calgary

Thanks to the new bylaw approved by the Calgary city council, Uber won’t be able to do business in the area, the ride-sharing service’s representatives told CTV News Calgary.

The new bylaw — effective on April 4, 2016 — imposes new rules on drivers who want to take part in Uber-like ride-sharing services:

– They need an annual operating licence from the city of Calgary
– A Valid Class 4 driver’s licence
– An annual police background check
– Proof of valid commercial insurance as required by the government of Alberta
– Proof of eligibility to work in Canada
– Proof of provincially approved 134-point mechanical inspection, conducted annually or every 50,000 km, whichever comes first.

Of course, Roger Richard, president of Calgary’s Associated Cabs, is satisfied with the new bylaw, as it creates a fair, level playing field, from his perspective. Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi says the ball is now in Uber’s court. Uber Calgary tweeted that it will “continue to advocate for solutions that create jobs for drivers and affordable transportation options for the public.”

“I’m very tempted to make a phone call to Lyft and say ‘looking at international expansion? Here’s some regulations that work really well for you,’” Nenshi said.

“The bylaw, as it currently sits, actually breaks in the entire model it is. It would make sure ride sharing would not be a reliable product,” said Ramit Kar, general manager of Uber Alberta. “It would not be able to bring on enough drivers to support the demand of the product and, quite frankly, the prices would just go up.”

An earlier survey revealed that Canadians mostly support Uber, but as you may recall from earlier reports, taxi drivers are against the ride-sharing service, and they are using every means possible to stop it from doing business in Canada.

Technology enthusiast, rocker, biker and writer of iPhoneinCanada.ca. Follow me on Twitter or contact me via email: istvan@iphoneincanada.ca

  • Michal

    is this what we can expect in rest of canada ? just … lame :/

  • Joe

    I don’t get it… what’s wrong with these regulations? Isn’t this the same thing that taxi drivers need to go through? Making sure the car gets inspected, running a police background check… this is standard stuff.

  • Uber sees its as more ‘red tape’ and will prevent them from signing up drivers on mass scale.

  • sam0101

    Now imagine your kid ordering this less expensive service after a party at a friends in the middle of the night. Would you still feel good about all the cash you are going to save when someone who did not go through these **basic requires picks up your kid, no background check (reliable), no valid driver licence and or insurance, with an unknown road worthiness car, etc? The one exception maybe:??? “Proof of eligibility to work in Canada”.

    It would be really helpful for this article to chart out the requirements for both a taxi driver and an uber driver: what they need to do their job and what they can earn from it.

  • Bafoon

    yeah this is what I’m most interested in – how will Toronto respond. I am sure every cabbie in Montreal and toronto will be jumping on this as a light at the end of the tunnel sort of thing.

  • Bafoon

    Hold on. Uber offers a service linking supply to demand. No different than the other cost-less option that your kid has after a night out at Chucks – which is to get his inebriated buddy to drive them both home.

    Ultimately Uber is offering a cheaper (in some instances) option to you as a consumer. You weigh the risk and pay a little less, through a more convenient route. Or – you pay more and go through a cabbie.

    I know that here in toronto – DESPITE the cabbies having these so called preventative checks – they are still the worst drivers and are pure pieces of work.

    – Fiddling through their phones as they drive you to your destination while conversing with their brethren in their own language.
    – Speeding past yellow lights, rather than stop
    – driving close to if not into the bicycle lane to cut across traffic.
    – cutting off cars, buses and streetcars to gain that additional competitive yard which will buy them $$$$ to last them a generation…
    – foul mouth, creepy, some downright deceitful

  • Lukas Fikr

    You just described typical Calgary cabbie, very likely Nenshi’s second cousin …