Days to Sell Out Developer Events: Google I/O vs WWDC

Horace Dediu of Asymco breaks down the number of days it takes to sell out developer events, comparing Google I/O to Apple’s WWDC:

After the iPhone SDK was launched, the WWDC took on a new dimension. It became a mobile development event. As a result, 2008 was the first year when WWDC sold out. Attendance tripled over the Mac-only event the previous year.

Every year since, not only has WWDC sold out but it has sold out quicker every time. The following chart shows the days it took to sell out WWDC. I also added Google I/O data for comparison.

Apple’s WWDC 2011 sold out in less than 10 hours yesterday–generating $8 million dollars ($1599 x 5000), or about $800,000 per hour. iOS is the platform that people want to develop apps for, and I don’t see signs of this slowing down anytime soon.

[Asymco]

Founder and Editor-in-Chief of iPhoneinCanada.ca. Follow me on Twitter, and @iPhoneinCanada, and on Google+.

  • Anonymous

    But doesn’t your graph show that Google I/O sold out 10 or 12 (depending on your numbers) times faster?

  • Rox

    Same question ? If no mention of Google in the article, why showing the graph ? A bit confusing.

  • Etdashou

    Same here,

    If we look at your graph: “GOOGLE OS (Android?) is the platform that people want to develop apps for, and I don’t see signs of this slowing down anytime soon.”

  • whipug

    Google I/O sold out much faster because it was announced before tickets went on sale. Furthermore, their ticket prices were much cheaper.

  • Anonymous

    So if Google I/O took only a hour to sell out as opposed to Apple’s 10 hours (I’ll be generous) wouldn’t Android be the hottest OS to develop for (according to your logic).

  • george

    The writer of this blog post is obviously still caught in the Steve job’s distortion field. Its too bad, this site does a very good job in putting articles and podcasts together, but they are so biased it becomes tougher and tougher to take them seriously.

    A great writert can see and show both sides of an argument or opinion and convince you why they are right. These articles really only see things one way.

  • Rox

    That could explain what we are seeing. Thanks for the comments.