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Flappy Bird Copies Being Rejected By Apple and Google

flappy-bird-update.jpeg

Despite the fact that the original title was removed from the App Store, the Flappy Bird phenomenon shows no sign of slowing down. The App Store’s top charts are currently filled with clones that are just as addicting and frustrating.

According to various developers, Apple and Google have reportedly started rejecting any games that have been submitted with the word “flappy” in their title.

Ken Carpenter, a Vancouver-based game developer, says Apple rejected his app called “Flappy Dragon” from the App Store. Below are the reasons for the rejection according to the App Store Review Guidelines:

Reasons:

22.2: Apps that contain false, fraudulent or misleading representations will be rejected

22.2

We found that your app, and/or its metadata, contains content that could be misleading to users, which is not in compliance with the App Store Review Guidelines.

We found your app name attempts to leverage a popular app.

Carpenter sent out this tweet after he found out his game had been rejected.

Carpenter is not the only developer that has been rejected. A tweet from Kuyi Mobile indicates that their game was rejected for the same reason:

Currently, the App Store’s top charts include two Flappy Bird clones, “Splashy Fish” and “Ironpants” which are positioned at #1 and #2, which do not contain the word “flappy” in their title.

MobileDevHQ has provided a chart which shows the average number of changes in the iOS Top Charts. As you can see in the chart below, the Top Charts were effectively frozen as of February 14. The chart soon returned to normal showing that it was not the effect of an algorithm change on Apple’s end.

appstore-chart-mobiledevhq

Apple is not the only company who has decided to reject Flappy Bird clones from the app store. Carpenter, Kuyi Mobile, and other developers have all stated that Google is also rejecting games that include the word “flappy” in the title.

multi-dev-flappy-clones-removed-google

Carpenter said:

“The first time I assumed it was because I included a phrase about ‘Flappy Dragon’ being the best flapping game to play now that ‘Flappy Bird’ is dead. My app was originally published with no issue and was online and searchable for a few hours.”

Within 24 hours of the email the search giant removed the app from the Google Play Store. Carpenter went on to remove “flappy” from the title and resubmitted the app to Google. Even with the word “flappy” removed from the title, Google removed the app from the Google Play Store a few hours after it was resubmitted.

Developers have been trying to jump on the success of Flappy Bird, but Apple and Google are trying to prevent that. It may not be long before we see both companies pulling apps for copying the concept of Flappy Birds, regardless of their title.

[via TechCrunch]

A technology enthusiast and Computer Science student. Follow me on Google+

  • Mhaddy

    Pretty poor reporting here, guys – practically a copy and paste job from TechCrunch with a measely “via TechCrunch” link at the bottom of your post.

    Unfollowed from twitter as your number of original content pieces has really dropped.

  • Jimmy

    Has anyone here been affected by this? Respond with your experience.

  • Denis

    I wonder if Apple and Google will start pulling games that have already been approved that are “Flappy Bird” clones.

  • http://www.iphoneincanada.ca/ Gary

    Thanks for your feedback, sad to see you go

  • Stefan

    I do not mind it. I actually like iPhone in Canada because they sum up all important news from various blogs.

    I have no need to follow 100 blogs to stay in game.

    Keep up the good work

  • http://www.iphoneincanada.ca/ Gary

    Thanks Stefan!

  • Mhaddy

    Meta news sites are great, this is one of the reasons why I loved this site – who has the time to visit dozens of sites when you can get your fix on one? But plagiarism is something else entirely and I think the phrase “imitation is the greatest form of flattery” was taken a little too liberally here.

    Com’on Gary, you can’t possibly stand behind this as quality journalism. From TechCrunch as one example:

    “However, that may not be the case for long. Word has it that both Apple and Google are now rejecting games that have the word “flappy” in their title.”

  • hooooly mackerel…

    lol buddy, you try and go try and be the source for ALL original news… this is a fact of journalism. all news networks will always source elsewhere if its news and know it wasn’t their own… iphoneincanada gives relevant stuff time to time and sources others that may trend or affect local peeps, i.e. carrier plans. no one gives a shit if you unfollowed, you’re not that important so get over yourself

  • Mhaddy

    I see you’ve completely missed the point of my post. I didn’t write what I did for self indulgence – I am but one of this site’s many thousands of visitors. I did so to let Gary know that his site is better than this. I used to run a pretty popular online gaming news website and this type of thing drove me nuts. Anyhow, I’m not going to clog the comments anymore than I have. Gary, I’ve left my email here if you want to chat further. I’m sorry for raising this here.

  • http://www.iphoneincanada.ca/ Gary

    You’ve made a point and we have made changes to our piece and will strive to be better next time.

  • http://www.iphoneincanada.ca/ Gary

    No need to apologize but we appreciate you sharing your feedback with us. Cheers

  • http://www.chrisd.ca ChrisD.ca

    So how did “Flappy Flyer” get approved then? Currently at #5 in the App Store.