iOS 9.3.1’s Siri Bypass Bug Fixed; Night Shift + Low Power Mode Trick Ends

This morning it was reported iOS 9.3.1 had a bug where Siri on the lockscreen could access contacts and photos (on iPhone 6s/6s Plus)—without the need for unlocking the device. Apple has since closed that loophole, according to The Washington Post:

An Apple spokeswoman confirmed that the bug was fixed Tuesday morning. Most consumers should have a fix in place — without the need for a software update.

Since this is a server-side fix, iPhone 6s or iPhone 6s Plus users do not need to change any settings or download updates to be protected—you just are now. If you attempt to search Twitter now with Siri from the lockscreen, you’ll be asked to unlock your iPhone first:

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The flaw was first uncovered by Jose Rodriguez, who seemingly always finds these lockscreen bugs. Rodriguez constantly messages us via Facebook about his latest discoveries—next time we’ll relay them to you faster.

Rodriguez first uncovered the lockscreen flaw at the end of March, when he tweeted he would like to see an Apple ‘bug bounty program’, which would mean those uncovering flaws or exploits would get paid.

Night Shift during Low Power Mode No Longer Works

Also, remember that trick that allowed Siri to enable Night Shift when Low Power Mode is turned on? Well, that no longer works, according to 9to5Mac. As you can see below, in our own tests, Apple has indeed disabled the workaround. Siri now says you’ll need to turn off Low Power Mode to use Night Shift:

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Well, that’s a bummer the trick to enable Night Shift while in Low Power Mode is gone. That was actually pretty handy.

Founder and Editor-in-Chief of iPhoneinCanada.ca. Follow me on Twitter, and @iPhoneinCanada, and on Google+.

  • coady

    But you were defeating the purpose of low power mode having night shift on……

  • It’s Me

    how so?

  • Joe Peplowski

    Night shift uses power.

  • Yes I’m aware of that, but there are times when you want to keep using your iPhone or iPad at night and battery is low, but you also want Night Shift on, as you know you’re going to plug it into charge before bed anyways.

  • It’s Me

    Well obviously it uses power. So does Low Power Mode, just less of it. Does night shift use so much extra power that it defeats the purpose of Low Power mode completely? Surely not.

    Then wouldn’t it be better to allow the user to decide whether they can explicitly choose to leave low power mode on but enable night shift, with the acknowledgement that it will not be as low as with night shift off?