LG UltraFine 5K Monitor Fix Coming to Address Wi-Fi Interference

Last year, LG teamed up with Apple to introduce its new UltraFine 5K monitor, meant to replace the outgoing Thunderbolt displays. It was certainly exciting to see LG stepping up to fill a gap, but then a few days back a strange problem came to exist: the monitors stopped functioning correctly when they were placed too close to a router.

Basically, the displays would flicker or freeze when they were within two metres of a wireless router. In the company’s initial response to the issue, it said for consumers to put their wireless router more than two metres away from their monitor, which was a disappointing solution to the issue.

It was initially believed that nearby Wi-Fi routers were the root cause of sporadic connectivity, but many are now refuting that in threads on the Apple Support Communities forum. The issue doesn’t appear to be widespread, as many units are operating without any issues, but those who are experiencing it report that their UltraFine monitor has a tendency to flicker and repeatedly disconnect from the machine it is plugged into.

An LG spokesman told Recode that the company is planning on adding additional shielding to newly manufactured UltraFine monitor models. Existing monitors will also be eligible to receive the additional enhanced shielding.

“LG apologizes for this inconvenience and is committed to delivering the best quality products possible, so all LG UltraFine 27-inch 5K displays manufactured after February 2017 will be fitted with enhanced shielding,” the company said in an email.

Ouch. Tough to be an early adopter of the new LG 5K display and have to deal with this.

World-traveling, tech-savvy, music-producing writer obsessed with all things Apple, video games, and the finer things in life, e.g. mezcal and tacos. When I'm not writing I'm exploring new places, eating new foods, and generally trying to be a decent human.

  • hlna55

    So basically they transformed R&D to just “D” and make the consumers test their products for nothing? How does something of this nature pass testing. Goes for everyone really… poor battery performance, exploding phones… seems to be the norm that early adopters of almost anything end up saddled with some type of issue.