New York Post: Apple Watch Sales Are Affecting The Traditional Watch Market


According to a new report from the New York Post, Apple Watch sales are impacting the traditional watch market.

Apple is expected to sell 20 million Apple Watches by the end of this year. Several analysts said that there are signs that some consumers are holding off on buying traditional timepieces. Nomura analyst Simeon Siegel said:

“Consumers are thinking about the investment involved in an Apple Watch and may be planning ahead by not buying other watches.”

Fossil Group, which also manufactures watches for Michael Kors, reported a 7 percent decline in revenue in the first quarter to $725 million. Michael Kors CEO John Idol said:

“Our watch business is not healthy in North America, whether that’s something that’s a trend, whether that’s something that’s driven around other entries into the category, we’re not exactly 100 percent sure.”

Do you think the Apple Watch has already made an impact on the traditional watch market? Let us know in the comments below.

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  • Imadudeadam

    While i dont recommend the average person buy an Apple Watch at this time (I have one and its not a “must have”… yet), it’s clear the average consumer has foresight and understands the impact Apple Watch will have on the market in short time.

    Of course we dont know what Apple Watch sales are right now, but i agree, and suspect people are holding off with the intent of buying one. The future is clearly smart-watches…

    with exception of super-high end. If i were to drop 50,000+ on a watch i would want it to be mechanical tour de force. not the same as the guy working at Subway.

  • Riddlemethis

    Umm. Do we have the actual raw data before jumping to conclusions?

    Fossil never has done well in North America.

  • Riddlemethis

    “The future is clearly smart-watches”

    that’s very debatable. some people said the same thing when digital watches came about in the mid 70s.

  • ShaBi

    While I don’t (or don’t want to) fully agree to that as well, it seems to be heading that way. Like it or not, younger generations these days just doesn’t have the same appreciation for the finer things in life. Most are so dependent on “do it all” products/devices, that their perspective of value is different on things like a mechanical watch.

  • ShaBi

    Agree. This has way more to do with wearable devices as a whole, and people
    being more dependent on mobile devices, than just the Apple Watch alone.
    Fossil was already seeing a drop long before the Apple Watch.

  • Mykeljon

    Another possible reason for the decline in sales of traditional watches is the disturbing fact that a significant percentage of the “younger generation” is actually incapable of reading an analog clock face. Just yesterday, a twenty something guy who was looking at an analog clock, asked me what time it was. I commented on the fact that he was looking straight at a clock. He told me that he had never learned how to tell time on that kind of clock. Many of my friends have had similar experiences. I found that a very disturbing experience because, not only did he not know how to tell time, he did not seem to care.

  • Eric

    Well Fossil actually makes all the MK watches

  • Eric

    Also why spend $300-400 on a MK watch when it doesn’t do much but tell the time.. when an Apple Watch at 349 can do so much more…

  • Sandrewb

    I haven’t worn a watch since my first smart phone, that is probably the main reason. Also, my sons are 13 & 15 and they both know how to read an analog clock due to the fact that we have 4 hanging on the walls of our house. I would think/hope most young people still know how to read an analog time piece.