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Over 18 Billion Text Messages Sent in Canada in Q1 2011

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Do you only communicate via text messages? According to the Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association (CWTA), Canadians sent out 18 billion messages in Q1 of 2011, a 10% increase compared to the 16.4 billion texts sent in Q4 2010.

Here are some more stats:

• 6.2 billion person-to-person text messages were sent in March 2011 alone, which represents an average of more than 199 million messages per day.
• Total text messages sent in 2010 numbered 56.4 billion, a 60% increase over the 2009 total of 35.3 billion messages.
• Canadians sent and received a total of 697 million text messages using Common Short Codes in Q1 2011, marking a 11% increase over the 626 million messages sent and received in Q4 2010.
• A total of 2.3 billion Common Short Code messages were sent and received by Canadians in 2010, representing a 36% increase over the 2009 total of 1.7 billion messages.

Texting today is a lot easier than before thanks smartphones like the iPhone. Sending rapid fire SMS messages has become second nature, unlike the days of grappling with T9 auto correct on your old Nokia candy bar. However, auto correct still has some room to improve.

These stats are a bit skewed as texts sent via third party apps like WhatsApp, BBM, Ping, iMessage (coming in iOS 5) and more aren’t included. How many texts do you send in a day?

[CWTA via MobileSyrup]

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  • Bruce L

    On average 250-270 a day. I’ve had a few months in the past with a hair over the 24k mark. 

  • Bruce L

    On average 250-270 a day. I’ve had a few months in the past with a hair over the 24k mark. 

  • Anonymous

    I hate texting. It’s inefficient, annoying and impersonal. I don’t mind it for small short things, but besides that it’s a nuisance. Why does this trend have to continue?

  • Anonymous

    I hate texting. It’s inefficient, annoying and impersonal. I don’t mind it for small short things, but besides that it’s a nuisance. Why does this trend have to continue?

  • Guest

    I agree. We can talk quicker than we can type, especially if we’re only using our thumbs. Plus, if you don’t respond to a text soon enough, you may miss out on something critical (in my case, appointment times for clients). Talking in real time enables us to arrange things immediately, versus waiting for responses, because you can get instant feedback.

  • Guest

    I agree. We can talk quicker than we can type, especially if we’re only using our thumbs. Plus, if you don’t respond to a text soon enough, you may miss out on something critical (in my case, appointment times for clients). Talking in real time enables us to arrange things immediately, versus waiting for responses, because you can get instant feedback.

  • Guest

    I agree. We can talk quicker than we can type, especially if we’re only using our thumbs. Plus, if you don’t respond to a text soon enough, you may miss out on something critical (in my case, appointment times for clients). Talking in real time enables us to arrange things immediately, versus waiting for responses, because you can get instant feedback.

  • Guest

    I agree. We can talk quicker than we can type, especially if we’re only using our thumbs. Plus, if you don’t respond to a text soon enough, you may miss out on something critical (in my case, appointment times for clients). Talking in real time enables us to arrange things immediately, versus waiting for responses, because you can get instant feedback.

  • Guest

    I agree. We can talk quicker than we can type, especially if we’re only using our thumbs. Plus, if you don’t respond to a text soon enough, you may miss out on something critical (in my case, appointment times for clients). Talking in real time enables us to arrange things immediately, versus waiting for responses, because you can get instant feedback.

  • Jon

    I love the concept of texting, I hate the cost, and lack of reliability.  Maybe my area is worse for it, but I constantly am having text messages delayed in sending and receiving (and this happens between many of my friends, so it’s not just my account).  The worst is between networks (eg: Rogers to Telus), and on weekends, however I’ve had texts delayed hours between my wife and myself.  Between friends, sometimes texts are just never delivered.  Incredibly frustrating.

    I’m trying to get my friends using Facebook Messenger or Kik since they seem a bit more reliable, and most of them have data plans now.  Texting is a scam by the carriers anyway, it costs them VERY LITTLE to operate texting (basically texts are sent over signals that your phone is sending/receiving to/from the towers anyway, it just costs them a bit to keep the infrastructure of servers and internetwork gateways going, but this should be very minimal these days… I could run the infrastructure off a handful of servers with NOSQL and  decently efficient programming).

    Hopefully the carriers lose out on the texting racket eventually… I strongly encourage everyone to use alternatives over their data plans…

  • Jon

    I love the concept of texting, I hate the cost, and lack of reliability.  Maybe my area is worse for it, but I constantly am having text messages delayed in sending and receiving (and this happens between many of my friends, so it’s not just my account).  The worst is between networks (eg: Rogers to Telus), and on weekends, however I’ve had texts delayed hours between my wife and myself.  Between friends, sometimes texts are just never delivered.  Incredibly frustrating.

    I’m trying to get my friends using Facebook Messenger or Kik since they seem a bit more reliable, and most of them have data plans now.  Texting is a scam by the carriers anyway, it costs them VERY LITTLE to operate texting (basically texts are sent over signals that your phone is sending/receiving to/from the towers anyway, it just costs them a bit to keep the infrastructure of servers and internetwork gateways going, but this should be very minimal these days… I could run the infrastructure off a handful of servers with NOSQL and  decently efficient programming).

    Hopefully the carriers lose out on the texting racket eventually… I strongly encourage everyone to use alternatives over their data plans…

  • Jon

    I love the concept of texting, I hate the cost, and lack of reliability.  Maybe my area is worse for it, but I constantly am having text messages delayed in sending and receiving (and this happens between many of my friends, so it’s not just my account).  The worst is between networks (eg: Rogers to Telus), and on weekends, however I’ve had texts delayed hours between my wife and myself.  Between friends, sometimes texts are just never delivered.  Incredibly frustrating.

    I’m trying to get my friends using Facebook Messenger or Kik since they seem a bit more reliable, and most of them have data plans now.  Texting is a scam by the carriers anyway, it costs them VERY LITTLE to operate texting (basically texts are sent over signals that your phone is sending/receiving to/from the towers anyway, it just costs them a bit to keep the infrastructure of servers and internetwork gateways going, but this should be very minimal these days… I could run the infrastructure off a handful of servers with NOSQL and  decently efficient programming).

    Hopefully the carriers lose out on the texting racket eventually… I strongly encourage everyone to use alternatives over their data plans…

  • Jon

    I love the concept of texting, I hate the cost, and lack of reliability.  Maybe my area is worse for it, but I constantly am having text messages delayed in sending and receiving (and this happens between many of my friends, so it’s not just my account).  The worst is between networks (eg: Rogers to Telus), and on weekends, however I’ve had texts delayed hours between my wife and myself.  Between friends, sometimes texts are just never delivered.  Incredibly frustrating.

    I’m trying to get my friends using Facebook Messenger or Kik since they seem a bit more reliable, and most of them have data plans now.  Texting is a scam by the carriers anyway, it costs them VERY LITTLE to operate texting (basically texts are sent over signals that your phone is sending/receiving to/from the towers anyway, it just costs them a bit to keep the infrastructure of servers and internetwork gateways going, but this should be very minimal these days… I could run the infrastructure off a handful of servers with NOSQL and  decently efficient programming).

    Hopefully the carriers lose out on the texting racket eventually… I strongly encourage everyone to use alternatives over their data plans…

  • 0mni

    That is like 1 Text message every 3.5 mins ….

    Assuming you sleep for at least 8 hours a day.

    960 mins in a 16 hour day.  960 divided by 270 ~= 1 message every 3.5 mins.

    That seems like an awful waste of time, especially when you consider it probably takes about 30 seconds on average to read and the compose a message.  Thats about 2.25 hours per day, just texting.  Pretty sure my numbers are higher than what they actually are, but even if its 1.5 to 2 hours a day, that seems really excessive.

    I haven’t double checked my math, as I didn’t want to waste more than 5 mins on this post 🙂

    I personally don’t like text messaging, I prefer e-mail, and even still I don’t e-mail that much.  I can say more in a conversation than I ever could in a message. 

  • 0mni

    That is like 1 Text message every 3.5 mins ….

    Assuming you sleep for at least 8 hours a day.

    960 mins in a 16 hour day.  960 divided by 270 ~= 1 message every 3.5 mins.

    That seems like an awful waste of time, especially when you consider it probably takes about 30 seconds on average to read and the compose a message.  Thats about 2.25 hours per day, just texting.  Pretty sure my numbers are higher than what they actually are, but even if its 1.5 to 2 hours a day, that seems really excessive.

    I haven’t double checked my math, as I didn’t want to waste more than 5 mins on this post 🙂

    I personally don’t like text messaging, I prefer e-mail, and even still I don’t e-mail that much.  I can say more in a conversation than I ever could in a message. 

  • Donna Steven1

    why do some of my text from a paticular person have a 01/01 and 01/02 etc? Does this mean that there is spyware on there phone?

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