Share:

Study Claims Canada has the Most Affordable Internet in the World

Share:

A new study, titled ‘The Inclusive Internet,’ was released by the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) early this morning.

The study measured prices and the competitive environment for both wireless and wired broadband services all around the world. The report found that Canada topped the United States, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and 70 other countries.

This study seems very odd because all other studies conducted by groups such as the CRTC have shown that Canada has one of the priciest internet plans in the world.

So you may ask, why does this study make Canada look much better? Firstly, the report lumped a large number of developing countries into one spot, making all developed nations look better.

Secondly, the study by the EIU takes into consideration the average gross income of the country. Finally, a number of countries that performed well in other studies, like Hong Kong, Finland and Denmark, were not included in the EIU’s study.

“Case in point: according to the EIU, a monthly postpaid service plan with 500 megabytes data eats up only 2 per cent of income in Canada, or 1 per cent in the U.S., Japan, Germany and France. The same plan requires 20 per cent of the average income in Malawi, 93 per cent in Niger and 44 per cent in Congo.

In other words, of course wireless service is relatively cheaper in Canada than it is in Malawi. But it isn’t relatively cheaper by this measure than in most other developed countries. Either way, it’s nothing to crow about.”

The EIU then counters its own finding by confirming that Canadian carriers enjoy some of the highest revenue in the world, with the highest average revenue per user. Canadian consumers are also spending more on their wireless services thanks to the always increasing costs of plans from the big three carriers.

I don’t know about you, but I’m paying more and more for wireless service in Canada but the service is not getting any better relative to the price change. What do you think about the results of this study? Let us know in the comments below.

[via Alphabeatic]

Share:

  • It’s Me

    So you may ask, why does this study make Canada look much better? Firstly, the report lumped a large number of developing countries into one spot, making all developed nations look better.

    Secondly, the study by the EIU takes into consideration the average gross income of the country. Finally, a number of countries that performed well in other studies, like Hong Kong, Finland and Denmark, were not included in the EIU’s study.

    In other words, they completely stacked the deck.

  • Lapsusone

    In Europe I used to pay 40€/month for unlimited 1GBs/200MBs Down/Up at home, and 20€/month for unlimited text, calls, and 50GB/month data cellular plan.

    Meh.

  • fredf1

    No. What they did was compare cost to income levels so that they looked at ‘affordability’.
    That’s not ‘stacking the deck’. It’s just another way of looking at it.

  • It’s Me

    That’s playing with the math. Did they remove certain countries from their study to make us look more affordable too?

    Honestly, skewing numbers and omitting inconvenient numbers is sort of exactly what stacking the desk means. I’d have said cherry picking but that doesn’t really cover the level of manipulation.

  • fredf1

    Nope, I still think you don’t understand.
    Any statistical analysis is based on certain assumptions.
    They chose not to look at the total cost but at affordability, i.e: cost compared to income.

    It doesn’t mean that we don’t pay a lot and that it isn’t too much and that the telecoms aren’t ripping us off.
    But how are they ‘skewing the numbers’?

    You’re unhappy about the costs. So am I.
    But this study doesn’t say it’s cheap in Canada and they haven’t cherry picked anything.

  • It’s Me

    Ummm, yeah, all of that was quite obvious. Of course the we’re looking at affordability. The article kind of makes that abundantly clear.

    If one wants to give the appearance that Canadians aren’t overpaying, when all other data shows we pay more than pretty much everyone, how do you do that? You change the question. Instead of “are we over charged” make it “can you afford it”. When you change the question, when you predetermine the answer, when you selectively include only numbers that are convenient and omit others when inconvenient, you can make the math say absolutely anything you want. Finland and Hong Kong throw off the math? Remove them. Easy peesie.

  • SOB

    So maybe internet is more affordable here than other countries but I don’t really care. All I know is that $80/month gets me 4GB data. In the US the same price gets u unlimited data.

  • Michel Plante

    I think those who create the study smoke ???? good Stuff or their simply CRAZY ????

  • Lakh Jhajj

    If I were you I would have stayed in Europe. Lol! Living over there is better in most if not all of the ways.

  • Lakh Jhajj

    How will the prices of internet or mobile plans come down in Canada when CRTC itself is openly supporting and making regulations that kill competition and favour the big 3?

  • brian.velazquez@mail.ru

    I have made 104 thousand bucks in last 12 months by freelancing from my house a­n­d I did it by wo­rking part time f­o­r 3 or sometimes more hrs /day. I was following a business opportunity I stumbled upon online and I am so happy that I was able to earn so much money. It’s very beginner-friendly and I am just so happy that i found it. Here’s what I did… EASYURL.NET/f2265

  • sully54

    You hit the nail right on the head fredf1. People are missing the fact that this study isn’t even measuring what people are complaint about it.

    Unfortunately, this would be considered fake news these days.

  • sully54

    A little critical thinking would have been nice when looking at this study. It doesn’t even measure what everyone is complaining about.

  • erth

    and it was funded by the Canadian carriers.

  • It’s Me

    No. Everyone is quite clear that it measures “affordability”. Of course, affordability is such a subjective term, that it is effectively meaningless from the outset. Further, it seems the study itself was objective, as they simply removed countries from the study that didn’t fit the desired model.

    One has to assume it was done because all other studies, ones that objectively measure quantifiable units, reflect so poorly on Canadian services.

    What’s next, a satisfaction and happiness index?

  • I feel they need to stop calling these “Studies” and rather.
    “Salesmen says you’re actually getting a good deal, despite what you’ve seen and read the past years.” Lol

    **fast talking guy**
    “Ad paid and sponserd by Shaw cable and Telus”.

  • Tim

    $55 ($62.15 after tax) for 8GB … not a bad deal, even if I had to go through a loophole to get it.

  • Tim

    Except it’s not the same price, it’s $80 USD for unlimited. That’s about $108 CAD

  • Mamba

    Alternative studies.

  • They are probably comparing plans based on speed and cost, but without concern to included data because most other countries have unlimited data. I’m sure they all seem more expensive than the 5 Mbps basic plans with 50 gigs included. If they compared them to the unlimited plans in Canada we would come up as more expensive.
    My plan in the US right now is 35$ per month unlimited with a 50 Mbps speed

  • Brenda

    These comparisons oversimplify. Comparing countries with vastly different size, geography, population and economic development is not going to give you a clear picture. And we rapidly get used to technological advances without looking back at how much we paid for how little in the past.
    I’m paying less for my cellular plan than I used to ($55 down from $80) and am getting more for my money (higher data quota, unlimited Canada-wide long distance that used to cost $30 extra, unlimited text, faster cellular speeds, better coverage).
    The only reason my home Internet cost hasn’t gone down is that I keep wanting faster speeds, a more stable network and unlimited bandwidth. If you cancel cable because there’s so much online that you no longer need it to keep up with the news and be entertained, $80 isn’t bad at all.

Deals