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UV Canada iPhone App Helps You Track UV Index Levels

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With summer in full swing throughout Canada, tracking the UV index is more important than ever. Thankfully there’s an app for that–UV Canada. This app not only provides the weather report but also provides a friendly interface for tracking the UV index along with other tips on how to protect yourself from the sun.

Data is provided by Environment Canada and the app uses your location to get the weather. You can easily select any city and quickly see the weather forecast and UV index. It’s a nice looking app to boot!

UV Canada is a joint project from the Skin Research Training Center and BC Cancer agency to help raise awareness over the dangers of UV, how to prevent skin cancer, and helpful hints on how to enjoy the sun safely. The app is free, and is a helpful resource to shows everyone how to prepare themselves for the sun.

As per the VCHIR:

Maryam Sadeghi, Ph.D. candidate in medical imaging analysis and research scientist with the Skin Care Centre at VGH, and a team of SFU computer science students, have created an iPhone application – UV Canada – that will give users up-to-date UV index, weather forecast, and sun safety information. This interdisciplinary project is an example of translational health research at VGH, using technology to help Canadians prevent skin cancer.

Pictures below:

 

 

Click here to download UV Canada, it’s free. Don’t forget to slather on that sunscreen!

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  • Anonymous

    What a great idea!  Wait till summer is practically over, then release an app that shows the UV level.  I could go one better…write an app with a list of cities, each displaying a static image saying the UV is low, release in October, and make sure it’s off the App Store before April.  A bargain at 99c!

  • Anonymous

    What a great idea!  Wait till summer is practically over, then release an app that shows the UV level.  I could go one better…write an app with a list of cities, each displaying a static image saying the UV is low, release in October, and make sure it’s off the App Store before April.  A bargain at 99c!

  • Anonymous

    What a great idea!  Wait till summer is practically over, then release an app that shows the UV level.  I could go one better…write an app with a list of cities, each displaying a static image saying the UV is low, release in October, and make sure it’s off the App Store before April.  A bargain at 99c!

  • Anonymous

    What a great idea!  Wait till summer is practically over, then release an app that shows the UV level.  I could go one better…write an app with a list of cities, each displaying a static image saying the UV is low, release in October, and make sure it’s off the App Store before April.  A bargain at 99c!

  • Anonymous

    What a great idea!  Wait till summer is practically over, then release an app that shows the UV level.  I could go one better…write an app with a list of cities, each displaying a static image saying the UV is low, release in October, and make sure it’s off the App Store before April.  A bargain at 99c!

  • Anonymous

    What a great idea!  Wait till summer is practically over, then release an app that shows the UV level.  I could go one better…write an app with a list of cities, each displaying a static image saying the UV is low, release in October, and make sure it’s off the App Store before April.  A bargain at 99c!

  • Anonymous

    What a great idea!  Wait till summer is practically over, then release an app that shows the UV level.  I could go one better…write an app with a list of cities, each displaying a static image saying the UV is low, release in October, and make sure it’s off the App Store before April.  A bargain at 99c!

  • Anonymous

    What a great idea!  Wait till summer is practically over, then release an app that shows the UV level.  I could go one better…write an app with a list of cities, each displaying a static image saying the UV is low, release in October, and make sure it’s off the App Store before April.  A bargain at 99c!

  • Anonymous

    What a great idea!  Wait till summer is practically over, then release an app that shows the UV level.  I could go one better…write an app with a list of cities, each displaying a static image saying the UV is low, release in October, and make sure it’s off the App Store before April.  A bargain at 99c!

  • Considering this is more of a marketing move to educate people on the dangers of UV, I don’t see a problem with it. It’s free, what do you expect right? 🙂

  • Considering this is more of a marketing move to educate people on the dangers of UV, I don’t see a problem with it. It’s free, what do you expect right? 🙂

  • Considering this is more of a marketing move to educate people on the dangers of UV, I don’t see a problem with it. It’s free, what do you expect right? 🙂

  • Considering this is more of a marketing move to educate people on the dangers of UV, I don’t see a problem with it. It’s free, what do you expect right? 🙂

  • Considering this is more of a marketing move to educate people on the dangers of UV, I don’t see a problem with it. It’s free, what do you expect right? 🙂

  • Considering this is more of a marketing move to educate people on the dangers of UV, I don’t see a problem with it. It’s free, what do you expect right? 🙂

  • Considering this is more of a marketing move to educate people on the dangers of UV, I don’t see a problem with it. It’s free, what do you expect right? 🙂

  • Considering this is more of a marketing move to educate people on the dangers of UV, I don’t see a problem with it. It’s free, what do you expect right? 🙂

  • Considering this is more of a marketing move to educate people on the dangers of UV, I don’t see a problem with it. It’s free, what do you expect right? 🙂

  • Tim Stringer

    While it’s clear that excessive sun exposure can cause skin cancer, there’s another side to this story. The sun is a major source of Vitamin D and when we’re wearing sunscreen we get little to no Vitamin D absorption, often leading to deficiencies. Ironically people with Vitamin D deficiencies tend to be much more susceptible to cancer and other diseases. Based on the advise of my doctor, my strategy is to spend some time in the sun (about 15-20 minutes at the peak period) without putting on sunscreen or covering up. I also take Vitamin D supplements – especially important during the winter months when we don’t get as much sun exposure here in Canada.

  • Tim Stringer

    While it’s clear that excessive sun exposure can cause skin cancer, there’s another side to this story. The sun is a major source of Vitamin D and when we’re wearing sunscreen we get little to no Vitamin D absorption, often leading to deficiencies. Ironically people with Vitamin D deficiencies tend to be much more susceptible to cancer and other diseases. Based on the advise of my doctor, my strategy is to spend some time in the sun (about 15-20 minutes at the peak period) without putting on sunscreen or covering up. I also take Vitamin D supplements – especially important during the winter months when we don’t get as much sun exposure here in Canada.

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