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Ottawa Asks Canadians to Take Internet Speed Test for Data on Rural Expansion [u]

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ISED internet speed test

Innovation, Science and Economic Development (ISED) Canada wants Canadians to take a high-speed Internet speed test, to help provide data for future broadband expansion to remote and rural communities across the country.

ISED explains, “by taking two minutes to complete a quick internet speed test, you’ll be helping us collect data to ensure that we expand high-speed networks to rural, remote, northern and under-served communities across Canada.”

The federal government has a goal of achieving a minimum 50/10 Mbps high-speed internet for all Canadians, over the next 10 years, part of its Connectivity Strategy, which will see up to $6 billion in investments in rural broadband.

The internet speed test is being implemented through a partnership with the Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA).

“We are very happy that the government has partnered with CIRA to ask Canadians for feedback on their internet connection. High-quality internet service has never been more important to Canada’s rural communities, yet too many gaps remain. Our Internet Performance Test is one of the most advanced internet tests available – it collects a broad range of connection data and allows testers to provide written feedback on the quality of their service,” said CIRA vice-president of product development, Dave Chiswell, in a statement to iPhone in Canada.



The CIRA internet speed test site, as of writing, is showing nearly 550,000 tests run in Canada. A quick test of the site saw our upload speeds reflect Speedtest.net, but our download speeds were way off at 12.1 Mbps, versus 316 Mbps on Speedtest.net (we’re on a 600 Mbps plan).

“CIRA’s vision for a truly connected Canada is one where every Canadian has access to a high-speed internet connection regardless of where they live. We look forward to working with the government to collect real-world data that can help support critical investments in our digital future,” added Chiswell.

Let us know if you’re going to participate in this internet speed test, and if you think it’s a worthy initiative or not.

Update August 21: The CIRA clarified why users may be seeing lower speed tests versus what their Internet plan is and also what other websites may show such as Ookla’s Speedtest.net.

A spokesperson says this test “captures the effects of network congestion and poorer last-mile connections”, using M-Lab’s Network Diagnostic Test (NDT), which “is considered the gold standard in the world of internet performance measurement.” The measurement that takes place is different from a test such as the one from Speedtest.net.

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