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Apple AirTags to Cost $39 USD, Slightly Larger Than a Toonie

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Apple AirTags have been on the cards for a while, and we finally have some pricing information.

That’s according to a new leak from Max Weinbach (via YouTube channel EverythingApplePro), who explains that Apple’s location-tracking AirTags could retail for $39 USD and measure a diminutive 32mm x 32mm x 6mm, making them smaller than the rival Tile Pro item trackers.

This makes them slightly larger than a Canadian ‘toonie’, which is 28mm in diameter.

The video notes that the information comes from a “retail source,” and that, while the price is “an estimate,” it is likely that AirTags will retail for approximately this figure.

If accurate, this leak means that AirTags are set to be tied for the title of most expensive key finder out there. The newly-announced (but still unreleased) Samsung SmartTag Plus is set to cost the same amount, and will use a similar ultra-wideband system to help you track down your lost stuff.

Cheaper options exist, including entry-level Galaxy SmartTags ($30 USD each), and the Tile Stickers ($40 for two). However, these devices rely on Bluetooth tracking, rather than the superior UWB. That means the range won’t be as good, and the lack of spatial data means the level of location accuracy won’t be as high.

AirTags have a clear advantage over the SmartTag Plus, however. Instead of a fob that has to be hooked onto something, leaks have suggested the AirTags will be a circular device that can be attached with adhesive or a special attachment. That makes it a lot more versatile than what Samsung has to offer.

AirTags have been rumoured for almost two years. The small item trackers are expected to be introduced to allow users to track their belongings, such as wallets, backpacks, keys, in the Find My app on iPhone, iPad, and Mac, which will send notifications as soon as the user become separated from their valuables, with the exception of when items have been left behind at a pre-defined “Safe Location,” such as at the user’s home or workplace.

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