iPhone + Book = PhoneBook For Your Children

Do you have young children? If you do, then the following video is a sign of many things to come for iPhone owners with kids. The Mobile Art Lab based out of Japan has created a concept of what could be the next wave of uses for the iPhone.

PhoneBook: Enabling You to Share Your iPhone with Your Kids!

PhoneBook combines your iPhone into a book and allows full interaction with the iPhone and book. Now, instead of being a potential deadbeat mother or father, you can start enjoying your iPhone with your kids! If this was available in stores, I can see these flying off the shelves like hotcakes during Christmas!

Check out the following video–this is just way too cool!

[Mobile Art Lab]

Founder and Editor-in-Chief of iPhoneinCanada.ca. Follow me on Twitter, and @iPhoneinCanada, and on Google+.

  • facebookapplicationdevelopment

    These things make me a lover of iPhone and iPhone application development

  • Dusty

    The ideas and toys kids get now a days…

  • roadcarver

    Woah!

  • That's what I said. Pretty neat!

  • Dutch

    Parent X Child….. Parchild?!

  • Dez

    Neat idea! The only thing i don't get it why they they multiply (x) instead of add (+) iPhone and Book.

  • rorypiper

    I love all the apps for kids out there. My daughter grabs my iPhone whenever she can, and she's pretty much taken over my wife's old iPod touch.

  • themystery

    It's cool but how's a kid supposed to develop a love for real books if you sit down with them and do something like this? Shouldn't their eyes be looking at pictures, following the narration through the spoken word and connecting the two for the total book experience that children have enjoyed for decades or longer?
    My child would have to be pre-school for me to consider something like this and even then I'm not sure a book with only static as well as moving pictures is a good thing, even at that young age.

  • themystery

    It's cool but how's a kid supposed to develop a love for real books if you sit down with them and do something like this? Shouldn't their eyes be looking at pictures, following the narration through the spoken word and connecting the two for the total book experience that children have enjoyed for decades or longer?
    My child would have to be pre-school for me to consider something like this and even then I'm not sure a book with only static as well as moving pictures is a good thing, even at that young age.