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The Siri Phrases List You Need to Know about

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Back in 2009 a list of voice commands was posted that could be spoken to Voice Control on your iPhone. At the time, that was seen as pretty impressive. Fast forward two years, and it’s unthinkable how far we’ve come now that Siri is here.

With yesterday’s announcement of the iPhone 4S, TUAW has posted an exhaustive list of possible phrases that Siri can understand and respond to. The list of possibilities are almost endless, and I recommend you check it out.

Check out a snippet below of email phrases Siri can understand:

Email

Sending Messages

Email Lisa about the trip
Email Jennifer about the change in plans
New email to Susan Park
Mail Dad about the rent check
Email Dr. Manning and say I got the forms, thanks
Mail Lisa and Jason about the party and say I had a great time

Checking Messages

Check email
Any new email from Michael today?
Show new mail about the lease
Show the email from Lisa yesterday

Let’s not forget the integration with the new Find my Friends app, for ‘finding’ (aka stalking) your friends:

Friends

Checking Up on Friends

Where’s Jason?
Where is my sister?
Is my wife at home?
Where are all my friends?
Who is here?
Who is near me?

If you haven’t seen the following video (via TechCrunch), you should. It’s from 1987 and introduces the Apple Knowledge Navigator, and shows the vision Apple had for a system like Siri, more than two decades ago:

Can’t wait to try Siri in Canada. Pre-orders start online on October 7th at 12:01AM PDT.

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  • Aha! That’s why there’s no mention of it on the Canadian site. Here in Canada, it’s:
    “Chequing Messages”
    “Cheque email”
    “Chequing Up on Friends”

    😛

  • Anonymous

    Am I the only one reminded of Bill Nye by that computer avatar in a bow tie?

  • The one and only science guy

  • JohnnyG

    The linked TUAW article indicates that “TUAW tracked down a set of example phrases…” not an exhaustive list. The presentation suggests that siri is intelligent and is able to adapt to different phrasings meaning there ought not be any one exaustive list.

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