Netflix to Block Proxy Access, “Respect and Enforce” Licensing by Location

Just over a week ago Netflix went pretty much global, available in 190 countries around the world. But that expansion now comes with some consequences, as the company’s VP of Content Delivery Architecture, David Fullagar, explained in a blog post this morning.

Essentially, Netflix will soon evolve their proxy detection, to prevent members from accessing catalogues outside of their home country. The reason for doing so is because “the historic practice of licensing content” by location has not gone away, yet. In the meantime, proxy access will be blocked “in the coming weeks”:

Some members use proxies or “unblockers” to access titles available outside their territory. To address this, we employ the same or similar measures other firms do. This technology continues to evolve and we are evolving with it. That means in coming weeks, those using proxies and unblockers will only be able to access the service in the country where they currently are. We are confident this change won’t impact members not using proxies.

A Netflix representative told Variety they will use “a variety of technologies to properly geolocate members and to avoid attempts to circumvent proper geolocation.” This means VPN services such as PureVPN may be blocked, but it’s too soon to conclude just how well Netflix will do that. However, one VPN provider source told us they “would not be worried” about the Netflix block, as workarounds will be there.

Content licensing isn’t going away anytime soon, so Netflix can’t change that. But with their hit original programming, such as House of Cards and Orange is the New Black, these will be available worldwide to all members, at any time. It makes sense why Netflix is pouring so much money into making its own TV shows and movies.

Founder and Editor-in-Chief of iPhoneinCanada.ca. Follow me on Twitter, and @iPhoneinCanada, and on Google+.

  • Ryan

    I can’t entirely blame them, but this does suck. At some point in the future we’re going to look back on regional blackouts and licensing and wonder what the fuck we were thinking.

  • randyritraj

    We wonder that now.

  • dave

    This is a huge deal for Canada, our Netflix content blows.

  • Matric

    you got that right chief

  • Aleks Oniszczak

    As soon as my VPN stops working with Netflix, I’m cancelling Netflix. It’s getting to be too much of a hassle.

  • Widohmaker

    The VPN providers will find a way around guaranteed.

  • Yep

  • Stentor7

    Especially in my situation, as an American working in Canada, I don’t like the fact that what I pay for is blocked by region. I pay for American content, I have an American account, but because I’m living in Manitoba, they’ve blocked certain shows because of regional licensure.
    It doesn’t matter if I can’t use a proxy, anything you want to watch on Netflix, or even Hulu or Amazon Prime that is blocked by license issues you can find for free on Solar Movie or Project Free TV.