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Get Free E-Books, E-Magazines from Your Library via OverDrive for iOS

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The Toronto Public Library has launched an awareness campaign to inform readers of free digital content available to borrow via Adobe’s Overdrive software. A recent survey found 48% of library users and 24% of non-users were aware of free ebooks via the TPL. Demand has surged for those aware of free content available from their library.

“Libraries have always connected people to information and there is now increasing demand for e-content,” said Jane Pyper, City Librarian. “We want to let as many people as possible know that e-books and e-magazines are available at tpl.ca/ereads. All you’ll need to access our e-content is a library card and Internet connection.”

The TPL shares the most download e-books and e-magazine this year:

E-books

A Tap on the Window by Linwood Barclay
The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith
The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America by Thomas King
Inferno by Dan Brown
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
Life After Life by Kate Atkinson
Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg
MaddAddam by Margaret Atwood
Omens by Kelley Armstrong

E-magazines 

The Economist
House & Home
Us Weekly
National Geographic
Rolling Stone

All you need are your library credentials to sign in (the iOS app will require a quick Adobe registration) as Adobe’s OverDrive powers over 22,000 libraries worldwide. There is a free OverDrive iOS app so you can read your titles right on your iPhone or iPad and they can even automatically download as well. Titles will expire on their own so there’s no late fees or trips to the library.

Below is an instructional video on how to set it all up:

The Toronto Public Library is just one of thousands of libraries which take advantage of OverDrive for digital lending.

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Click here to download the OverDrive Media Console for iOS–it’s free. Let us know if you’ve been using this system for free books and magazines.

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  • turnoffyourmind1234

    I used Overdrive a couple of years ago and found the whole process cumbersome. I might try again though

  • ddsmak

    My wife and I have been e-books from the Vancouver Public Library for a few years now. The process of getting a book is very smooth and easy. Love the system. Only one thing that is not so good…not enough copies of e-books for the same title, often has to wait till someone has finished. If it’s a popular book, I’ve seen up to 50 + people waiting, and each book is good for 3 weeks, potentially one could waits 150 weeks for an e-book, lol. Having said that, most e-books don’t have 50 people waiting. I’ve found typical is around 3 or so, give and take.

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