CRTC Opens Public Hearing for CCTS Mandate Review


The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) is holding a public hearing between November 3 and 6, 2015 in Gatineau, to review the structure and mandate of the Commissioner for Complaints for Telecommunications Services (CCTS) and is calling on all Canadians to add their voice to the matter.

“While our public hearing is being held in the National Capital Region, the room itself stretches from coast to coast to coast to include all Canadians. The Commissioner for Complaints for Telecommunications Services plays an important role in a competitive marketplace, and is a resource for those who have experienced problems with their service providers. We invite Canadians to share their views throughout the public hearing to help us make decisions that are in the public interest,” Jean-Pierre Blais, CRTC Chairman said.

Considering that the CRTC has determined the need for a code of conduct for television providers, the regulator would mandate the CCTS to administer the code as it does now with the wireless code of conduct.

The CCTS is the organization that handles more than 10,000 wireless complaints per year and helps Canadians and small business solve their issues with wireless, Internet, and telephone services.

During the public hearing, the CRTC will assess whether the CCTS’s structure and mandate is appropriate in the light of the evolution of the telecom market. Furthermore, it will also assess whether something needs to be modified for it to be adopted as the administrator of the television service provider code of conduct, given that many Canadians purchase their television services from the company that provides their wireless services.

Canadians can submit their views using the online discussion forum between November 2 and 9, 2015.

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  • JB

    Mandate the end of Usage Based Billing and regulate wholesale pricing more aggressively. Usher in the era of MVNOs. Or just break up the big 3 into tiny little pieces that actually compete with one another.