Apple Formally Objects to UK Surveillance Law


Apple has expressed major concerns over the UK government’s investigatory powers bill, saying it would weaken the security of the “personal data of millions of law-abiding citizens,” reports the Guardian.

“We believe it would be wrong to weaken security for hundreds of millions of law-abiding customers so that it will also be weaker for the very few who pose a threat,” Apple said. “In this rapidly evolving cyber-threat environment, companies should remain free to implement strong encryption to protect customers”

In a submission to the bill committee, Apple also called for changes before the bill is passed and pointed to the areas it wants to see altered. According to the submission, the bill would require Apple to alter the way its popular iMessage works, which would weaken encryption and enable security services to eavesdrop on the service.

“The creation of backdoors and intercept capabilities would weaken the protections built into Apple products and endanger all our customers. A key left under the doormat would not just be there for the good guys. The bad guys would find it too.”

Mobile security is just one part of the problem: Apple also threw out the idea of hacking into its own desktop operating system, as it will be forced to do so if the bill passes, since the bill contains provisions that require communications firms to assist security services when they need to hack into devices.

If the bill were enforced, Apple would lose some of the trust it has gained from customers, the submission suggests.

“It would place businesses like Apple – whose relationship with customers is in part built on a sense of trust about how data will be handled – in a very difficult position,” Apple says.

Also, the company is worried about the scope of the bill, as many of the provisions apply to companies regardless of where they are based, giving the bill international scope, even though it is at first glance domestic legislation only.

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  • johnnygoodface

    UK gouvernement is wrong! Simply wrong! Stop acting like you don’t get that “A key left under the doormat would not just be there for the good guys. The bad guys would find it too.” Also I’m pretty sure that if Apple has to comply with the UK law, it would effect ALL iOS devices all around the world; that means that ALL of our devices wouldn’t be safe anymore from any of those who have/find this backdoor!!!

  • Corey Beazer

    They should just stop doing business with the UK, bet they’d change their minds pretty quick.

  • m Arch Tom’s on Bar N Ass


    Dear Apple ! We all believe You think to high of yourself , you’re just work tools and gaming devices suppliers after all. ( mostly for waste of time/entertainment activities ).

    i can see the point of this new bill in UK parliament, after terrorism attacks in tunisia and france, and also against the british/english community, suspicious of the catholic ” government ” being involved in terrorism acts and aiming to extortion of EU funds/public money to hire more security officers and catholic police officers, we can all see very well why the government won’t allow apple to keep on eventually assisting, organizing of terrorism acts and likely concealing responsibilities of EU catholic communities. ( some catholic terrorists involved in terrorism acts and then claiming those in the name of islamic state ) marc