Share:

Quebec-Based Law Firm to File Class Action Against Netflix

Share:

A Quebec man is looking to gain millions in compensation from Netflix, alleging that the video streaming company violated consumer rights when they hiked their subscription fees.

The class action document, which was filed in Quebec’s Superior Court earlier this month seeks permission to sue Netflix. Pierre Boivin, the lawyer representing the consumer, said:

“They had to send a notice which mentions exclusively the rate that the people were paying and the new rate. They also have to mention that the consumer would have 30 days to cancel the contract if they don’t agree with this increase, and that’s not what Netflix sent. They did not respect this provision of the Consumer Protection Act.”

The Quebec-based law firm is acting on behalf of an estimated 1.45 million subscribers in the province. The class action seeks a reimbursement of the fees paid since the price hike in 2016, which works out to roughly $14 million. However, the lawyers are seeking an additional $7.5 million in damages.

Netflix has not issued any official comment regarding the matter.

[via Metro News]

Share:

  • FragilityG4

    Oh stop it. You can cancel at anytime.

  • Riddlemethis

    You stop it. You’re missing the point.

  • FragilityG4

    Please, enlighten me…..

  • Riley Freeman

    please leave these stupid lawsuits to the americans. This is dumb

  • Decodering

    My first reaction was also, “Oh, come on…” But if there is a rule — one that is extremely easy to implement and not burdensome administratively or financially — that Netflix didn’t obey, then there are grounds for recourse. The amount sought is excessive and too American-like, but the courts will take care of that if the case gets heard.

    If Netflix, or any other media company, is allowed to flout an easy rule, it will only embolden the company or companies to ignore others that are potentially more important.

    Another point, which is more contentious, is that Netflix offers almost no content in French or from Quebec and yet charges people the full rate. I’m not trying to start a debate on the prickly issue of language, but it is a source of frustration for many in Quebec and French speakers outside of the province. So when Netflix shirks its duty over something so trivial, of course there is going to be someone who sees a way to claim a little bit of justice. (Remember, Netflix is notorious for not being subject to CRTC rules and fighting efforts to bring it under those rules.) For those of you who say that if people don’t like the service then they shouldn’t sign up, you’re missing the point. People do like the service, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be improved to respond to local concerns. I’m a native English speaker in Quebec, and it bothers me as it seems an affront to cultural sensibilities and a lost opportunity to bolster cultural diversity.

  • johnnygoodface

    In Quebec there’s the Consumer Protection Act in place. Thus Netflix or any other sellers must obey those rules. That’s plain and simple. I have nothing against Netflix, but when you want to sell in a country/province/state you need to know the rules there. The Consumer Protection Act has been implemented in Quebec for years, and it’s main purpose is to protect the consumer, and I think it very Avant Garde to implement such a thing.

  • Michel Plante

    Come on guys for 1-2$ ????

  • FragilityG4

    I guarantee the language of the act has been misinterpreted. There is no contract with Netflix, you can cancel at anytime with no penalty. Why would they have to give notice? If you don’t like the increase leave, you’re not bound — that is what consumer acts are for, to make sure there’s no excessive increases while you’re on contract with no way out.

  • johnnygoodface

    I tend to agree with you, but there must also be a loophole in the law found and exploited by the lawer… Don’t know what thought.

  • mcfilmmakers

    It’s not dumb. The law in Quebec is clear when it comes to the process of hiking fees.

  • mcfilmmakers

    You’re right, but you’re also wrong. While there is no contract, the monthly service auto charges you if you don’t cancel.

    Therefore, you would pay the rate hike without knowing there was a rate hike.

    That’s illegal.

  • mcfilmmakers

    It’s always 1-2$. With bell, rogers, Vidéotron or even Netflix, it’s always 1-2$. This law exists because of that 1-2$.

  • FragilityG4

    I’m sure if you check the fine print it will say “by signing up you agree to terms of service which is but not limited to allowing Netflix to charge you monthly on your credit card without a term contract yadda yadda yadda” thus forgoing any consumer protection act. Alas, the loophole.

  • mcfilmmakers

    Not a loophole. The law clearly says such provisions in a contract are illegal.

  • FragilityG4

    Have you read it? I’m sure the terms say that if you agree you waive all those rights. Nevertheless it’s not by definition a contract because you can cancel at anytime. You are not bound by any term.

  • Riley Freeman

    its dumb

  • mcfilmmakers

    If dumbnmeans illegal, then yes. Otherwise, you need a dictionary and practice your vocabulary.

  • Riley Freeman

    its dumb. You are just one of those people that cry about every little thing. We all got the notices. It’s no surprise you agree with this stupid Quebec logic. Quebec is the province with the dumbest laws anyway

    oh and i am born and raised in quebec

  • mcfilmmakers

    Spoken like a true hypocrite. The only one crying is you. No, NOBODY got any notice. That’s the whole reason for the lawsuit.

  • mcfilmmakers

    The law is clear: a contract cannot ask a signer to waive their rights. Read the law. It’s been proven time and time again, a contact that asks a signee never to sue is not a legal contract. You always have the right to sue. No contract can break the law.

  • FragilityG4

    There is no contract. They can cancel at anytime. Peoples rights get waived all the time when signing contracts. Don’t think it doesn’t happen. There are always loopholes.

  • Riley Freeman

    lol ok nobody did right

Deals