Share:

YouTube for iOS Now Dynamically Adapts to Vertical, Square Video

Share:

YouTube has finally updated its iOS app so that everyone can view vertical videos as they were shot: in full screen. This eliminates the need for turning into landscape mode and watching with giant black bars.

In the past, the YouTube mobile apps stuck to the same horizontal video window no matter the content and added varying degrees of black bars to pad the space. With the latest update, YouTube’s dynamic player adapts to the video’s natural format.

Square and vertical video will fill up the screen, with whatever space remaining below containing the video description, actions, and watch suggestions. Tapping the full-screen icon will now let vertical videos occupy the entire display.

YouTube announced plans to introduce this feature back in August, and released it globally to all users today. With more and more vertical videos being uploaded to YouTube, it only makes sense for the iOS app to get support, especially since Android has had this feature for two years.

[via CNET]

 

Share:

  • YouTube SUCKS!

    New YouTube app in the recent months completely s.u.-c.ks. No swipe to close minimized videos. Ads are no longer skippable. Annoying repetitive ads. Pro-Tip: If watching long YouTube videos (ie: 10 min+ ones), open the link to the video in your Safari browser on iPhone for ZERO ads as opposed to ads every 2 minutes.

  • FragilityG4

    How about people just stop shooting video in portrait? Problem solved…

  • LouisDC

    Phones should have an option to always shoot videos in landscape mode, whatever the orientation of the device. You would get less resolution when holding the phone vertically, but the video would still be horizontal (with a resolution of about 1024×576).

  • I totally agree, however even I’ve been in a couple rare situations where a portrate video is better.

    Example, watching a tall free falling ride at an amusement park. The situations are rare, but sometimes needed.

  • FragilityG4

    I just step back a bit Hahaha I get it but even in those situations I still personally prefer landscape.

  • Aleks Oniszczak

    Things change. More people are viewing and creating videos on their phones – and the natural way to hold a phone is in portrait mode. I say use the orientation that suits your subject.

  • FragilityG4

    I disagree. Portrait for video is terrible and people should stop filming that way.

  • Aleks Oniszczak

    Why?

  • FragilityG4

    Because it’s not a natural format for video.

  • Aleks Oniszczak

    The way it works is that you’re supposed to provide evidence to back your claim when asked, not just say the same thing again.

    Here, watch this – How are you holding your phone now? I’ll bet you’re holding it in its NATURAL position: vertical. Better grip than if you rotated it horizontally. Easier to hold and easier to create video – hence more natural.

    And what’s the natural way to view a portrait video on your phone? Just continue holding it the way you are.

  • Sam

    I would prefer that phones use square sensors (width of landscape) so they can shoot in either orientation without losing resolution. And use the extra pixels to augmented the active pixels.

  • FragilityG4

    Here’s your evidence, show me one feature film in portrait— then I will say it’s a natural position. That’s how it works.

  • Aleks Oniszczak

    My point was that things are changing. The article in question shows evidence of that – YouTube now works well in portrait mode since more people are using it. My prediction is that unless something comes around that replaces our phones, this trend will continue and we will eventually see movies made in this format. Maybe exclusively for phones, maybe not, but it will happen.

    Screen dimensions change – back in the day of Wizard of Oz screens had the same 4:3 ratio as iPads have today – almost square. That’s why CRT TVs ended up being the same ratio – to copy movie screens. Movie screens only became wider to differentiate from TVs. And then HD TVs became wider to copy movie screens once again etc. They are always changing and copying and competing. So it can happen again.

    Believe this or not, I just realized I’m actually typing this comment on a monitor that is in a portrait orientation. I have two monitors connected to my mac – one landscape and one portrait. It’s amazing for web browsing. And as it turns out, I’m ready for the future of video 😉

  • FragilityG4

    Widescreen was adapted because it allows you crop tighter shots on the subject while allowing the background to remain visible thus creating the illusion you are part of the space. This way of presenting film is not going anywhere soon. Will it one day? Perhaps but not now. If portrait shooting is the future why is the orientation of the X’s camera in landscape? Film in portrait looks amateurish and should not be done. Yes it’s YouTube and yes most posters are amateur but shouldn’t we hold society to higher standard?

  • Aleks Oniszczak

    “Will it one day? Perhaps but not now.” Looks like we agree.

    “Film in portrait looks amateurish” Well that’s mostly the case now, I agree, but there are already some professionally done video ads on Facebook that are meant to be viewed in portrait. With so many eyes glued on Facebook, I can see that increasing.

    “If portrait shooting is the future why is the orientation of the X’s camera in landscape?” Well, if we based the future on what the iPhone X does, then we can look forward to movies with a notch on the left side, and a great big bar on the bottom of the screen 😉

  • FragilityG4

    My god you’re still obsessing over the notch. Geez the notch is nothing. You never see it and the bar disappears in video mode. Stop being so cynical. You will see more notches on phones in the future so the same type of screen can be achieved so get over it. Yes I agree portrait might eventually be a standard, but that’s because it would be ignorant of me to say never. Having said that I don’t foresee it happening anytime soon as it is not a natural way to view film.

  • Aleks Oniszczak

    It’s natural to view it that way on a phone.

    Ever talk to anyone with a broken screen on their phone – they say oh yeah, I’m used to that – I don’t even notice it anymore. Well, if that’s your standard, then sure a piece missing from your screen is fine.

    Maybe if the notch becomes popular on other phones (and they are silly enough to stretch the video into the notch area as Apple does) then maybe videos will start being filmed with the notch in mind and nothing important can ever be allowed to happen on the left side of the screen where the notch might be (or top of screen in portrait). If you think that’s silly, well that’s what Apple is asking developers to do when designing apps now. Can’t put anything under the notch – just have a wasted space instead. Can’t put anything at the bottom of the screen because heaven forbid something taking the space needed for the so very very important bar. Have to leave that space empty. Oh, want to place something in the corners of the screen – no no no, it’s not a “safe area” as Apple calls it because the iPhone X cuts off the corners. The phone looks nice, but so many compromises and limitations are the result.

  • FragilityG4

    Geez you complain a lot for someone who has never used the phone outside of an Apple store. You have no valid opinion until you use it. If you don’t think you’ll like it that’s fine, keep it to yourself and don’t post here. I don’t think I’ll like an Android so I don’t go to android sites— why? It’s pathetic and I have better things to do, much like this conversation. Let me excuse myself from this as the circles have made me bored and dizzy. Cleaning my hose is more interesting and that’s what I’ll do. Merry Christmas to you.

  • Aleks Oniszczak

    A clean hose is very important, I agree. Good hygiene never goes out of style. Merry Christmas fellow hoser.

  • FragilityG4

    Take off eh.

Deals