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Apple to Improve Working Conditions of Retail Employees as Union Efforts Continue

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Apple is reportedly agreeing to improve the working conditions of its retail staff. News of this comes as unionization efforts made in part by Apple Store employees continue.

As reported by Bloomberg‘s Mark Gurman, Apple is now establishing a 12-hour window between each employee shift given. This increases the allotted window by two hours from its previous 10. In addition, Apple is ensuring that employees won’t have to work past 8 PM more than three days a week unless they volunteer to work the late shift.

In addition, employees are no longer expected to work six days in a row. Moving forward, Apple will only schedule its staff to work a maximum of five days without a day off in between. However, Bloomberg notes that Apple may make some adjustments to this based on holidays or tentpole product launch periods ie: the iPhone launch. Staff will also be granted a dedicated weekend day off for each six-month period worked.

According to the report, these changes are to be made by Apple in the coming months. Those who spoke to Bloomberg said these changes were to be integral in improving working conditions alongside previous improvements to benefits, sick days, and vacation time. In February, Apple bumped these integral perks in order to sustain its staffing and work culture.

While Apple is playing ball to improve working conditions, head of retail Deirdre O’Brien has been outspoken on pushing back at employee’s union efforts. Last month, O’Brien sent a video to employees dissuading them from unionizing. While acknowledging that employees have the right to join or not join a union, O’Brien also says encouraged “consult a wide range of people and sources to make sure you understand what it could mean to work at Apple under a collective bargaining agreement.”

Unionization efforts are currently underway in Washington state, New York City, and, Maryland in the U.S.

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