Rogers Q3 2015: Wireless Revenue Up 3%, 77,000 Net Postpaid Additions

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Rogers’ wireless network revenue increased by 3% to $1.77 billion in the third quarter of 2015 compared to the same period a year ago, driven by continued adoption of Rogers Share Everything play and the acquisition of Mobilicity, the carrier reported today.

What’s more, the past three months have been busy and productive: Rogers announced net postpaid subscriber additions of 77,000, which is more than four times the figure for the corresponding quarter a year ago. The carrier reported operating revenue of $3.38 billion and net income of $472 million, up from last year’s $405 million for the same period.

As Rogers points out in the press release, they activated and upgraded 737,000 smartphones this quarter, up 20% compared to the 614,000 in the same period last year. As a result, smartphone owners account for 88% of its total postpaid subscriber base as of September 30.

Its total subscriber base stands at 9.82 million including the 154,000 subscribers it acquired with Mobilicity. Blended ARPU increased 1% to $61.02, which compares to $60.96 reported a year ago. The carrier notes, however, that excluding the impact of roaming revenue and the Mobilicity and Wireless Home Phone subscribers, blended ARPU would have increased by 3% this quarter and 4% year to date.

Finally, Rogers notes that since January its LTE network in the country has tripled in size. They activated AWS-1 spectrum a month after acquiring it and are continuing to roll out their prime “lower block” 700 MHz LTE spectrum. Rogers’ 700 MHz spectrum coverage now stands at 71% of Canada’s population.

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  • IAmTaka

    “and are continuing to roll out their prime “lower block” 700 MHz LTE spectrum.”

    This is why even if I grow to hate rogers, I will never leave.
    All my friends have Bell, anytime we are inside a large building/elevator they get no service.

    Note: I get that YOU might get service with Bell whatever your inside, I understand a lot of buildings still get reception. I’m sharing my experiences from being at my college, my work, and home basement. Anytime my friends are in those three locations. Dead phones while mine is full bars.

    It’s amazing the other two haven’t purchased lower spectrums yet.

  • jay

    all to expensive