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Judge Overrules Samsung Objection to Juror Video Showing Apple Products

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Get your popcorn ready folks. The second Apple vs Samsung kicks off Monday and prior to the start, the latter filed an objection to show an updated video which explains the U.S. patent system, since it depicts numerous Apple products. Samsung argued this would would proven it from a ‘fair trial’ as by ‘impartial’ jurors, reports Re/code.

Samsung wanted the jury to see this older, outdated video:

…instead of this updated video from November 2013:

Just this afternoon, Judge Lucy Koh has overruled Samsung’s objections, as per the ruling below:

It is hereby ORDERED that:

  • Samsung’s objection to Apple’s proposed version of the Federal Judicial Center instructional video (ECF No. 1534) is overruled. The parties shall bring the November 2013 version of the video, “The Patent Process: An Overview for Jurors,” and shall include the handout referenced in the video in the jury binders.

Just last week Apple gave media access to an engineer that worked on the original iPhone, to provide the public with a glimpse of the work involved to create the company’s first smartphone.

Jury selection for this second trial beings tomorrow. According to Apple’s court filing, here’s the language being used against Samsung (via TIME):

“Apple revolutionized the market in personal computing devices,” Apple attorneys wrote in court filings. “Samsung, in contrast, has systematically copied Apple’s innovative technology and products, features and designs, and has deluged markets with infringing devices.”

The Samsung devices in question are: Admire, Galaxy Nexus, Galaxy Note, Galaxy Note II, Galaxy SII, Galaxy SII Epic 4G Touch, Galaxy SII Skyrocket, Galaxy SIII, Galaxy Tab II 10.1, and Stratosphere.

…and here’s what Samsung has to say against Apple:

“Samsung has been a pioneer in the mobile device business sector since the inception of the mobile device industry,” Samsung attorneys wrote. “Apple has copied many of Samsung’s innovations in its Apple iPhone, iPod, and iPad products.”

The Apple devices in question are: iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, iPhone 5, iPad 2, iPad 3, iPad 4, iPad mini, iPod touch (5th generation), iPod touch (4th generation), and MacBook Pro.

Apple wants Samsung to pay up to $40 royalty per device sold that had used the former’s innovations. If Apple is successful in court, Samsung could pay up to $2 billion. If Samsung were to prevail, Apple’s costs are estimated to be $6 million.

Make sure you grab an extra large bowl for your popcorn because this second trial is going to be interesting. The only winners out of this will be the lawyers.

Founder and Editor-in-Chief of iPhoneinCanada.ca. Follow me on Twitter, and @iPhoneinCanada, and on Google+.