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Apple’s Mac App Strategy Increasingly Confusing: Bloomberg

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Apple’s Mac app strategy has become more confusing than ever.

Bloomberg‘s Mark Gurman stated in his latest issue of “Power On” that as Apple rejuvenates its computer hardware product line, the Mac application strategy has become more confusing than ever.

“Prior to this laptop, I had been using its 16-inch predecessor from 2019,” Gurman writes. “From the beginning, that ‘Pro’ computer really couldn’t handle simple everyday tasks like simultaneously having dozens of web tabs open at once, communicating on Slack and Messages, watching video, and scrolling through Twitter.”

Gurman points out that he is currently using the new MacBook Pro with the M1 Max chip. The performance of the 16-inch model with Intel processors is massive. However, the one key issue of this device is the application ecosystem.

Apple’s Mac App Store has made some progress in recent years. It is no longer a “ghost town,” but it has also become a little messy. At present, Apple and third parties provide many different ways for Mac application development. This has created chaos for the developer community and sometimes confuses consumers.

“Apple has made strides with the Mac App Store in recent years, and it’s no longer the ghost town it once was,” the report continues. “But it’s also become a bit of a muddle. Apple and third parties now offer several different ways to make Mac apps, creating confusion in the developer community and sometimes for consumers.”

In addition, Apple has previously introduced a cross-platform application development strategy that allows developers to optimize their iPad applications for iMac use, or to allow unmodified iPhone applications to run on desktops. However, this strategy has not been popularized as quickly as Apple hoped.

“While Apple’s Mac hardware is stronger than ever, the company must now focus on unifying its Mac software ecosystem — for the benefit of its own products, third-party app developers, and, of course, consumers.”

Read the entire, worthwhile article over at Bloomberg.

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