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Walmart Canada Triples its Tesla Semi Truck Order

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Walmart Canada says it is ready to triple down on its conversion to an electric fleet, ordering 130 total of Tesla’s upcoming Semi trucks, reports Tesla North.

The retailer originally placed orders for 10 trucks back in November 2017, added 30 more in September 2018, and today announced another 90 Tesla Semi truck reservations, making for a total of 130 total electric trucks from Elon Musk’s company.

“Tripling our reservation of Tesla Semi trucks is part of our ongoing effort to innovate the business and prioritize sustainability,” said John Bayliss, Senior Vice-president, Logistics and Supply Chain, Walmart Canada, in a statement. “By converting 20 per cent of our fleet to electric vehicles by the end of 2022 and committing to alternative power for all fleet vehicles by 2028, we are putting safety, innovation and sustainability at the forefront of our logistics network.”

The Tesla Semi has a range of 804 kilometres (500 miles), which Walmart says is in line with its general fleet system in Canada, allowing drivers to make single day round trips. The long range will also allow Walmart to convert faster from traditional diesel trucks.

“We are tremendously excited to equip our drivers with this next generation equipment. The safety and smart elements in the design are at the heart of our smart transportation ambition which will use technology and data to lower our operating costs and improve safety for associates,” said Francis Lalonde, Vice President, Transportation, Walmart Canada, in a statement.

According to Tesla, its Semi truck can accelerate from 0-60 mph in 20 seconds with a full 80,000-pound load and can climb up 5 per cent grades at a steady 65 mph (versus 45mph for diesel trucks). Below is a video compilation of Tesla Semi trucks seen in the wild:

Walmart plans to have a 100 per cent alternatively powered fleet by 2028, while it plans to have zero emissions across the company by 2040. By the end of 2022, Walmart says it wants to convert 20 per cent of its fleet to electric power.

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